Lua Ing-hua

A Vernacular-Speaking Rice-Popper
:::

2020 / August

Cathy Teng /photos courtesy of Jimmy Lin /tr. by Brandon Yen


February 21 has been designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization as International Mother Language Day, in order to highlight the importance of preserv­ing linguistic diversity. Dominant languages have been making inroads into less powerful vernacu­lars, and efforts are being made throughout the world to save mother tongues from extinction. In Taiwan too, there’s one young man—Lua Ing-hua—who sets great store by the preserva­tion of the Taiwanese language, also known as Taiwanese Hokkien. Lua has vowed to speak no Mandarin for the rest of his life, with a view to alerting the nation to the existential danger confronting Taiwanese.


Some have come to know Lua Ing-hua (nicknamed A-Hua-Sai, meaning “Master Hua”) because of their interest in his handcrafted thoo-lang, a kind of traditional rice huller which has become a rarity. Others admire the puffed rice he makes. Still others know him for his much-­publicized fluency in English, Taiwan­ese, and Hakka.

A Taiwanese-speaking, rice-puffing man

The van pulls into the campus of the Hai Siann Waldorf School in Taichung City’s Wuqi District. Lua has barely unloaded his tools when he is greeted by a crowd of students on a second-floor balcony. “A-Hua-Sai! A-Hua-Sai!” The air vibrates with their excitement. They heard from their teacher about Lua’s planned visit a few months ago, and all of them have been looking forward to this special day.

Lua starts to count down: “Five, four, three, two, one… bang!” He deftly shakes out the grains of brown rice that have popped in the hot pressure vessel, folds them into maltose syrup, and stirs the mixture in a big bowl. After pouring the mixture out onto a wooden tray, Lua uses a wooden roller to flatten it. He slices the puffed rice with a special knife. The children enjoy watching this dramatic process: a rare treat especially for those little ones whose daily staple is no longer rice.

From Australia to Nanzhuang

Lua Ing-hua has gained something of a reputation in Taiwanese language promotion circles. He is often invited to give talks at schools, advocating the importance of “speaking one’s native language,” as well as ­displaying his thoo-lang and performing rice puffing, both of which are part of Taiwan’s cultural heritage. Lua’s career resembles that of a peripatetic missionary, but he says: “Actually I’ve never had any real plans for my life.”

At senior high school, Lua’s homeroom teacher wanted him to study medicine, but he wasn’t interested. Instead he listed non-medical science courses on his college application form and was admitted to the Department of Photonics at National Chiao Tung University. After graduation, he didn’t want to pursue postgraduate studies and went instead to fulfill his compulsory military service. After that, averse to finding a permanent job, he traveled to Australia for a working holiday.

When he returned to Taiwan from Australia, he was invited by a friend to spend time in Miaoli County’s Nanzhuang Township, where he learned how to make thoo-lang from an old master craftsman. For Lua this was a continuation of his globetrotting, as he went from an English-speaking country to a region where the vernacu­lar is Hakka, another unfamiliar language for him.

A nascent Taiwanese identity

Lua was born in Taichung in 1986, the year the Democratic Progressive Party was established. His family had settled in Taiwan before the island came under Japanese rule (1895‡1945). In 1987, martial law was lifted, and in 1989 publisher Cheng Nan-jung burned himself to death in protest at the continuing suppression of free speech. By the age of three, Lua had rubbed shoulders with several crucial events in the history of Taiwan’s transition to democracy.

However, it wasn’t until Lua entered university that he began to participate in social movements and to explore issues such as farmers’ rights and land expropriation. These engagements led him to contemplate whether the government was treating every citizen equally, or whether there were in fact deep-seated social inequalities.

Afterwards he moved to Nanzhuang and became an apprentice to a maker of thoo-lang rice hullers. He then began to grow rice himself and learned to make puffed rice. He has mastered all stages of the journey of each grain of rice “from soil to mouth,” from growing through hulling to puffing. Moreover, Lua has visited more than a hundred schools in Taiwan to introduce thoo-lang and traditional puffed rice. His outreach activities are fueled by wider concerns: do children today understand Taiwanese culture? Do they know who they are, where they come from, and where they’re headed?

While demonstrating how to make puffed rice at a nursery school in Tamsui in 2018, Lua felt like talking to the children in Taiwanese. He was surprised to find that the vast majority of them did not even understand the simplest greeting tak-ke-ho (“hello everyone”). “This doesn’t bode well,” he thought: if this situation continued, perhaps the Taiwanese language, and the other vernaculars in Taiwan, would not survive the current century.

For historical and political reasons, Mandarin as a dominant language has invaded Taiwan’s public sphere, to the exclusion of the other languages spoken by people of various cultural heritages. Having become aware of the danger faced by Taiwan’s vernaculars, Lua has ­decided to forswear speaking Mandarin for the rest of his life. He describes his obsessive urge to learn Taiwanese: frantically checking dictionaries, imitating older people’s accents, and forcing himself to think and write in Taiwanese. In Lua’s view, for a language to survive people must be able to read and write in it. In this digital age, “people use written and spoken language primarily on their smartphones, so if Taiwanese can’t be written down, it will certainly become obsolete one day.”

Language and culture are inseparable

Language is a medium that preserves culture and witnesses history: they depend upon each other. Lua mentions the two main Taiwanese words for “soap” as examples: sap-bun and te-khoo, both of which gesture toward Taiwan’s history.

Taiwan occupied an important place on trade routes between East and West during the Age of Discovery, serving as a hub for interactions between many countries. The French for “soap” is savon, while in Spanish it’s jabón. These cognates sound similar to the Taiwanese word sap-bun. The linguistic borrowing here testifies to the region’s rich history of international relations. As for te-khoo, te means “tea,” and khoo is a ring or disc. The word refers to the discs of tea-seed press cake left over from tea-seed-oil extraction. These discs were used for cleaning. That nearly half of Taiwanese people once used te-khoo for cleaning purposes is indicative of how much tea Taiwan produced in its heyday as a major exporter.

The Taiwanese language encodes these and other clues from the past; to decipher them is to relive Taiwan’s history. Unfortunately, however, with the impend­ing extinction of the vernacular, oblivion awaits the historical memories recorded in it. Their disappearance will be an irreversible loss for our culture.

A trilingual YouTuber

As a student, Lua worked hard to improve his English proficiency. During his year in Australia, he gained the confidence to put his language skills into practice. Many netizens have asked him for English learning tips. “Taiwanese people are obsessed with learning English. I have capitalized on this phenom­enon, using English as a way to catch people’s attention and get them to listen to what I really want to say.”

Having something to say about the threatened demise of the Taiwanese language, but unwilling to say it in Mandarin, Lua makes full use of his other languages: each additional language, he hopes, will help him reach a new audience. His trilingual fluency in Taiwanese, English, and Hakka has thus become his trademark. Lua’s YouTube channel—“Tsiok Ing Tâi”—has attracted more than 48,000 followers. Tsiok Ing Tâi features “Eng-Tâi Express,” a series of videos created by Lua and his collaborator A’iong, a New Yorker living in Taiwan. They select two news articles every week, one in English and the other in Taiwanese, and translate each into the other language. The topics they have discussed so far include weather, semi­conductors, kangaroos, and the classroom discipline monitor, a student role peculiar to Taiwan’s education system. They hope to show their audience that the Taiwanese language lends itself to every imaginable topic in daily life.

Realizing how important it is to safeguard their native languages, many countries have been making efforts to preserve their vanishing vernaculars. Lua mentions Welsh in the United Kingdom, Ainu in Japan’s Hokkaido, and Maori in New Zealand, all of which are threatened by the incursions of dominant cultures and languages. However, public awareness has led those governments to promote and reward the study and preservation of vernaculars. The most crucial task for them is to help people take pride in speaking their native languages.” For the Taiwanese people, this is something worth pondering and emulating.

Why has Lua decided to avoid speaking Mandarin from now on? In response to this question, he refers to Hong Kong’s Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill Movement. “You may ask Hongkongers why they have stood up for their rights, and whether they really think they will succeed.” Lua continues: “I also know that the survival of the Taiwanese language is not very likely, but this isn’t a matter of success or failure. For me, it’s a matter of having no choice but to do it.”   

Do you remember those words and phrases your mother taught you when you were a babbling toddler? Next time you go back home, learn some more from her, and say more! Let us work together to preserve our vernacu­lars and to give Taiwan’s cultural diversity a chance to survive.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

思思念念講台語

賴咏華的足英台三聲道

文‧鄧慧純 圖‧林格立

聯合國教科文組織訂立每年的2月21日為「世界母語日」,提醒世人保存多樣語言的重要性,更期望在理解、對話的基礎上,加深世界人民相互的了解,並促進文化多樣性。但現實中,強勢語言的侵襲如潮水一波又一波,母語的搶救運動在全球各地發生,在台灣也有一位青年──賴咏華,思思念念台語的續存,要用他剩餘的生命時間,喚醒台灣社會對母語存續的危機意識。


有人認識賴咏華(人稱阿華師)是因為那從沒見過的「塗壟」(早期農村的碾米工具),有人是吃過他做的「磅米芳」(米香),也有人是聽到阿華師一口流利的英、台、客三聲帶而靠過來。

講台語、磅米芳的少年

車子駛入台中梧棲海聲華德福學校校園,阿華師的工具還沒卸下車,教室二樓陽台圍著的學生一聲聲呼喊著:「阿華師!阿華師!」興奮之情溢於言表。學校老師說早幾個月就預告阿華師要來,孩子們都很期待,林心智老師還特別創作一首童謠,在阿華師磅米芳時,幼兒園的孩子唱著:「磅米芳/磅米芳/阿華師咧磅米芳/磅到歸半工/磅!一下噴著鼻孔/阿擱有的黏著頭鬃。」應景極了。

阿華師口裡倒數,「5、4、3、2、1、磅!」再俐落地倒出受熱氣膨脹的糙米粒,混在麥芽糖中,在大鍋內翻攪,倒入木盤後,用木棍桿平,再用特殊的刀具切塊。這是孩子們愛看的戲碼,也是少吃米食的新生代鮮少能見到的風景了。

一卡皮箱,從澳洲流浪到南庄

賴咏華在台語圈中小有名氣,他常受邀到校園演講,倡議「講母語」的重要性,展演著塗壟、磅米芳這樣的文化資產,過得像傳道人的生活,但他說:「其實我的人生一直沒什麼計畫。」

學生時期,他自言是會讀書的孩子,但也同許多學子一般,「我不知道自己要做什麼,但是知道自己一定不要做什麼。」高中的導師想要說服他讀醫,他沒有興趣,填志願就避開醫科,照著理工科的排名,考上交通大學光電工程學系。畢業後,不想讀研究所,先去服役,退伍後不想找工作,就跑去澳洲打工。

在澳洲轉了一圈,回到台灣,受朋友邀請,他又拖著在澳洲用的同一只行李箱,到了苗栗南庄拜師學做塗壟。對賴咏華來說,這是一個流浪的歷程,從一個說英語的國度流浪到一個說客語的地方,兩地都說著他不甚熟悉的語言。

萌生台灣意識

1986年,賴咏華出生於台中的本省家庭,同一年民進黨成立,1987年台灣解嚴,1989年鄭南榕為追求言論自由而自焚,那一年他剛滿三歲;與台灣民主轉型過程的重要事件擦身,但如同當時台灣許多家庭迴避政治議題,賴咏華成長的家庭亦然。

高中時期,物理老師是黨外的老前輩,他才聽聞許多黨外的故事,卻未曾深思求證。直到上了大學,跟同學一起參加社會運動,碰到農民權利、土地徵收等議題,讓他思考政府是否公平地照顧全體國民,質疑社會的天秤是否偏了。

後來他落腳在南庄,拜師學做塗壟,又跑去種稻,再學做磅米芳,一粒米從「從泥土到嘴唇」(種田、碾米、米芳)的過程,賴咏華都包辦了;他還曾透過網路募資籌得資金,跑遍全省一兩百間學校,展示塗壟、磅米芳的文化。這些行動,透露他的在意:現在的孩子是否知道百年前台灣的模樣?知道什麼是台灣文化嗎?知道自己是誰?從哪裡來?未來要往哪兒去?

2018年,在淡水一間幼兒園,賴咏華照例演示磅米芳的步驟,突然想跟孩子說台語,一句「逐家好」(大家好)的招呼語,卻有九成的孩子聽不懂。這讓他心想「害呀!」這樣下去,台語可能撐不過21世紀,台灣其他母語也面臨同樣的境況。

因為歷史、政治的諸多因素,華語佔據多數的公共場域,壓迫了其他族群母語的生存空間。正視到母語的困境,賴咏華決定在往後的生命不再說華語。但從五歲進入幼稚園後,華語佔據了他人生的精華,當時已32歲的賴咏華台語程度其實「離離落落」(零零落落)。但是,他卯起來學台語,形容自己像是偏執狂般的查字典,模仿長者的口氣發音,用台語思考,用台語書寫。賴咏華的概念中,一種語言要能長遠活下去,一定要能讀、能寫。尤其在3C時代,手機全面攻佔人們的視網膜,「現代人使用文字與語言主要在手機上,所以台語如果不能讀、寫,在這個時代一定會被淘汰。」

語言是水,文化是魚,魚若離水,必死無疑

語言是保存文化、見證歷史的媒介,兩者相依相存,賴咏華曾經寫下:「語言是水,文化是魚,魚若離水,必死無疑。」

賴咏華舉例,新冠肺炎防疫時期,政府鼓勵大家多用「肥皂」洗手,「肥皂」一詞在台語中,唸成「雪文sap-bûn」和「茶箍tê-khoo」兩派,而這兩派用字與台灣歷史大有淵源。

台灣在大航海時期是東方貿易航線的重要據點,與世界各國交流頻繁。賴咏華教學生點開Google 翻譯,用英文soap翻譯成法文是savon,或翻譯成西班牙文的jabón,兩種語言的發音都與台語的sap-bûn相近,語言相互借用的現象,佐證了台灣曾有的國際貿易時期。而另一派讀音「茶箍tê-khoo」,「tê-khoo」是茶樹籽經過壓榨成油後,茶渣壓製成塊狀,被拿來當作清潔的工具。在歷史上,曾經有將近五成的台灣人拿tê-khoo做清潔之用,可以想見當時茶葉的產量之大,也印證台灣曾經是茶葉王國的歲月。

這些歷史的蛛絲馬跡藏匿在語言裡面,台灣400多年的歷史,在各族群母語中一定留有這樣的密碼,說明台灣曾經的生活樣態;但讓人遺憾的是,隨著說母語人口日漸消逝,這些記憶也會隨之消失,這是一個文化不可承受之痛。

足英台三聲道磅米芳

學生時期勤練出流利的英文發音,再加上去澳洲一年訓練了開口說英文的膽識,許多網友傳訊問賴咏華怎麼學英文。「台灣人學英文的風氣太過頭了,幾乎把英文當作神明來供拜,所以我反過來利用這點,我的英文其實是一種『表演』,吸引更多人來了解我想說的事情。」

「因為我對於這個議題(台語將消失)有話想說,不說出來心裡很難過。可是我又不想說華語,怎麼辦?」他把自己會的語言都拿出來講,多一種語言,也許就有多一些人聽得懂。台、英、客三聲道成了他的標誌,賴咏華在YouTube開設「足英台三聲道磅米芳」頻道,目前已有4.8萬人追蹤。賴咏華還邀請在台灣的紐約人阿勇(@阿勇台語)一起拍攝「英台EXPRESS」單元,每周兩人各選一則新聞,將英文新聞翻成台語,把台語新聞翻成英文,「現在YouTuber要不就是很漂亮、很辣,要不就是講話很好笑,我們別的贏不了人家,就翻譯比較厲害。」討論的新聞包括天氣、台灣教育特有的風紀股長、半導體、袋鼠等用語,希望讓大眾了解用台語能談天也能說地,各種議題都不成問題。

放眼國際,許多國家已經認知到,守護自身語言的重要性,積極投入資源挽回消逝中的語言。賴咏華舉例,如英國境內的威爾斯語、日本北海道的愛奴語、紐西蘭的毛利語,它們都遭遇強勢文化的衝擊,面臨文化語言保存不易的局勢;但透過意識的覺醒,官方多管齊下地提供母語研究與保存獎勵,最重要的是「要讓人民覺得講母語是光榮且驕傲的。」這點值得台灣人深思與借鏡。

問賴咏華如何決心不再說華語?他反而說起這一年多來香港人的反送中運動,「你問香港人,他們為什麼要站出來抗爭,他們真的認為會成功嗎?」「我也知道成功(台語存活)的機會不大,但就算不會成功還是要做。從頭到尾都不是成不成功的問題,是我自己『不做不行』的問題。」

還記得牙牙學語時,母親教你的話嗎?回家多學一句、多說一句吧!為母語的存續盡一分心力,台灣的多元文化將有機會能流傳下去。

母語を守るために——

台湾語を話し、ポン菓子を作る頼咏華

文・鄧慧純 写真・林格立 翻訳・山口 雪菜

国際連合教育科学文化機関(ユネスコ)は2月21日を「国際母語デー」に定め、世界の人々に言語と文化の多様性を守ることの重要性を呼びかけている。より多くの対話を通して世界の人々が互いを理解し、文化の多様性を促進していくためである。しかし、優勢な言語が次々と波のように押し寄せ、世界各地で母語保存運動が起きている。台湾でも一人の青年——頼咏華が台湾語の存続に生涯をかけようと決意し、台湾社会における、母語存続への危機意識を高めようとしている。


頼咏華(阿華師)を知っている人は、彼の「塗壟」(昔の農村の籾摺り臼)を見たことがあるからかも知れないし、彼が作った「磅米芳」(ポン菓子)を食べたことがあるからかもしれない。あるいは彼が英語‧台湾語‧客家語をいずれも流暢に話すからかもしれない。

台湾語を話し、ポン菓子を作る

台中市梧棲の海声ウォルドルフ学校に到着すると、阿華師が車から道具を下ろすより早く、2階のベランダから生徒たちが「阿華師!阿華師!」と興奮して声をかける。先生によると、数か月前に阿華師が来訪することを予告して以来、生徒たちは大いに期待していたとのことだ。林心智先生は、阿華師のポン菓子のために童謡まで作り、幼稚園の子供たちが歌っている。

阿華師が「5、4、3、2、1、ポン!」とカウントダウンをすると熱を受けて膨らんだ玄米が出てくる。それを麦芽糖の入った大なべに入れて混ぜ、木の型枠に入れてローラーで平らにし、特殊な道具でカットしていく。これが子供たちの大好きなイベントである。米を食べることの少なくなった若い世代には珍しい光景だろう。

鞄ひとつでオーストラリアから南庄へ

頼咏華は台湾語圏では知られた人物だ。しばしば学校に招かれて「母語を話す」ことの重要性を語り、昔ながらの籾摺り臼やポン菓子機を展示し、まるで伝道師のような生活をしている。だが「実はもともとライフプランなど何もなかったのです」と言う。

学生の頃は勉強のできる子どもだったと言うが、多くの生徒と同様、「やりたいことは分からないが、やりたくないことは分かっていた」。高校の先生は彼を医学部に進学させようとしたが、彼は興味がなく、医学部は避けて、同じ理工系の交通大学光電工学科に入った。卒業後は大学院に進む気にはなれず、兵役に就き、退役後も働こうという意思はなく、オーストラリアでアルバイトをしながら旅をした。

オーストラリアを一周して帰国した後、友人に招かれ、同じ鞄一つで苗栗県南庄へ行き、師匠に弟子入りして「塗壟」作りを始めた。これは流浪のプロセスだったと頼咏華は言う。英語を話す国から客家語を話す土地へ移ったが、どちらも馴染みのある言語ではなかった。

台湾意識の芽生え

1986年、頼咏華は台中の本省人家庭に生まれた。同じ年に民進党が結成され、1987年に戒厳令が解除され、1989年に鄭南榕が言論の自由を主張して焼身自殺した。台湾の民主化における重要な事件が続いたが、当時の多くの家庭と同様、彼の家でも政治の話をすることはなかった。

高校の物理の先生は反体制派の古参で、その先生から初めて反体制の物語を聞いたが、それでも深く考えることはなかった。大学に入り、同級生と一緒に社会運動に参加して、農民の権利や土地徴用といったテーマに触れるようになり、政府は全国民を公平に扱っているのか、社会の天秤は偏っていないのか、と考え始めた。

南庄で「塗壟」作りを学び始めてから、今度は稲作やポン菓子づくりを学んだ。一粒の米が、土から口に入るまで(稲作、籾摺り、ポン菓子)のプロセスをすべて学ぶと、クラウドファンディングで資金を集め、全台湾の100を超える学校で塗壟を展示し、ポン菓子づくりを披露した。こうした行動の背後には、こんな気がかりがあった。——今の子供たちは百年前の台湾の姿を知っているのか、台湾文化を知っているのか、自分は誰で、どこから来て、どこへ向かうのか知っているのだろうか、と。

2018年、淡水のある幼稚園でポン菓子づくりを披露していた時、台湾語で「逐家好(皆さん、こんにちは)」と言ったのに、子供たちの9割がこれを聞き取れなかったのである。これは大変なことだと思った。このままでは、21世紀のうちに台湾語は消失してしまう。台湾の他の母語も同様の運命にある、と。

歴史や政治的要因から、台湾の公共の場ではほとんど華語が使われており、その他のエスニックの母語の生存空間は狭められている。この問題に気付いた彼は、今後の人生において、二度と華語を話さないことを決意した。だが彼自身、5歳で幼稚園に入ってからずっと華語の環境で育ち、32歳になっていた当時は台湾語のレベルも低かった。そこで彼は懸命に勉強した。狂ったように辞書を引いたと言う。年配者の発音を真似し、台湾語で考えて台湾語で文章を書いた。頼咏華の考えでは、ひとつの言語が長く存続していくには、読み書きができるものでなければならない。デジタルの時代となり、「現代人が文字を使うのは主にスマホなので、読み書きができなければ台湾語は淘汰されてしまいます」と言う。

言語は水、文化は魚

言語は文化を保存し、歴史を証言する媒介であり、言語と文化は互いに依存している。「言語は水、文化は魚です。水を離れたら、魚は生きてはいけません」

頼咏華はこんな例を挙げる。台湾語では石鹸のことを「雪文sap-bun」または「茶箍te-khoo」と言うが、この二つの単語は台湾の歴史と大きく関わっている。

大航海時代、台湾は東方貿易航路の重要な拠点で、世界各国と交流していた。頼咏華は生徒にGoogle翻訳を使って英語のsoapをフランス語とスペイン語に訳させる。フランス語はsavon、スペイン語はjabónである。この二つはいずれも台湾語のsap-bunの発音に近く、借用語であることがわかる。もう一つの「茶箍te-khoo」というのは、茶の実から油を搾った後の滓を塊状にしたもので、さまざまなものの洗浄に使われた。歴史上、台湾人の半数近くはte-khooを洗浄に使っており、その生産量の多さから、台湾がかつて茶葉王国であったことも分かる。

こうした歴史のさまざまな手掛かりが言語の中に隠されているのである。台湾の各エスニックの母語の中に、400年の歴史にかかわる手掛かりが残っているに違いなく、それが台湾のかつての暮らしを教えてくれる。しかし残念なことに、母語を話せる人がしだいに減り、そうした記憶も一緒に消えていく。これは一つの文化にとって耐えがたいダメージである。

トリリンガルのYouTuber

学生時代に懸命に英語の発音を練習した頼咏華は、一年にわたるオーストラリア旅行で英語を話す度胸もついた。今では多くのネットユーザーが彼に英語の勉強方法を教えてほしいとメッセージを送ってくる。しかし「台湾人は英語をあまりにも重視しすぎています。そこで私はこれを逆手に利用することにしました。私にとって英語は一種のパフォーマンスで、これを通してより多くの人に私の考えを伝えたいのです」

「私は台湾語が消失してしまうという問題を多くの人に伝えたいのですが、華語は話したくありません」と言う。そこで、自分が話せる華語以外の言語は全部使うことにした。一つでも多くの言語で話せば、その分だけ、多くの人が聞いてくれるかもしれない。話せるのは台湾語、英語、客家語で、それが彼のトレードマークとなった。彼はYouTubeに「足英台三声道磅米芳(Tsiok Ing Tai)」というチャンネルを設け、すでに4万8000人のフォロワーがいる。さらに彼はニューヨーク出身で台湾に在住する阿勇とともに「英台EXPRESS」というコーナーも制作している。毎週、英語のニュース1本を台湾語に翻訳し、台湾語のニュースを英語に翻訳して紹介する。「見た目の良さや面白さでは他のYouTuberにかないませんが、翻訳は悪くないと思います」と言う。天気から教育や半導体、カンガルーなどの用語まで使い、皆が台湾語でさまざまなことを議論できるようにしたいと考えているのである。

世界に目を向けると、多くの国の人々が自分たちの言語の重要性に気づき始め、消失しつつある言語を救うために資源を投入し始めている。イギリスのウェールズ語、日本の北海道のアイヌ語、ニュージーランドのマオリ語など、と頼咏華は例を挙げる。これらの言語は優勢な文化の衝撃を受け、文化と言語の保存が難しくなっている。しかし、意識の覚醒を通し、政府部門も母語の研究や保存を奨励し始めている。最も重要なのは、「人々が母語を話すことを誇りに感じることです」と頼咏華は言い、この点において台湾人は深く考え、海外を参考にするべきだと考える。

二度と華語は話さないことを、どう決意したのかと問うと、彼は香港の民主化運動について語り始めた。「香港人に、なぜ闘うのか、運動は成功すると本気で思っているのか、と聞いてみてください」と。「私も(『台湾語の存続』が)成功する確率は高くないと思っていますが、仮に成功しないとしても、やらなければならないのです。最初から、成功するか否かの問題ではなく、私自身が『やらなければならない』ことなのです」

まだ言葉を話し始めたばかりの幼い頃、母親がどんな言葉を教えてくれたか覚えているだろうか。家に帰ったら、母親の言葉を少しでも学び、話してみよう。母語存続のために力を尽くすことで、台湾は多様な文化を残していける可能性が高まるのである。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!